ZINE ZINE PINKY RING: AN INTRODUCTION

The origins of zine making counter culture are long imbedded in the history of the subjugated citizens of the world who have become incongruous with mainstream culture as a result.

According to Wikipedia the first “Zine” (short for magazine) was created by Benjamin Franklin and was distributed amongst psychiatric patients in a Pennsylvania Mental Hospital.

This is a far stretch from what I intend on elaborating upon which is of course how zine’s have come to play a roll in the graffiti subculture we are all so obviously fond of, but there is definitely something I like about the idea of a bunch of drooling lobotomized 18th century psychopaths getting kicks off of underground press. Picture this:  A bunch of gin nosed dirty pirates getting down on some dirty reading.  Perhaps it’s just that this very notion embodies something about the ideology behind zine making.  It is a social path that is most certainly “prohibitive of inclusion in more traditional media”.  In other words, we aren’t welcome (but we don’t give a fuck either).

I really don’t care to get into a dissertation about the political implications of zine culture as a form of underground media that can be used as a vehicle to convey anti government messages, but it is relevant to point out that that concept in itself is something that is also thought to be true of graffiti.

It seems obvious that Zine making would become a natural expansion of Graff culture.

Now i’m going to stop writing like a pretentious art school broad with a half assed degree that pleases my parents but no job. The reality of the situation is that I’m a broke ass hard working girl living it up in the land of LA that has an unnaturally large nerd hard on for grimy surfaces, nasty corrosive inks, the smell of spray paint and a compulsive urge to share my perspective to boot.

Its obvious that photo documenting graffiti became necessary in lieu of the buff, and also served to allow the fan boy/girl demographic to indulge in the shenanigans second hand.  Zine’s do just that but have the added bonus of being unique pieces of art in themselves, while also letting you shamelessly self promote without looking like a total douche, plus they are legal (boom).

To be honest, I’m running out of steam.  I don’t really feel the need to articulate the zine/graffiti relationship now that i’m getting down to it.  I guess I just wanted to make you aware of my presence as well as my intentions.

I’m waiting on a butt load of material, but am ultimately going to be posting Graff zine reviews from here on out for your reading pleasure.

Boom Town.

 

 

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